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Gain a deeper understanding of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on Google

Editor’s note:

Now when you search for "Posttraumatic Stress Disorder," “PTSD” or related queries on Google on mobile, you'll see a Knowledge Panel that will give you the option to tap “check if you may have PTSD”, which will bring you to PC-PTSD-5, a clinically validated screening questionnaire to assess your likelihood of having the condition. To ensure that the information shared in the PC-PTSD-5 questionnaire is accurate and useful, we’ve partnered with the National Alliance on Mental Illness and the National Center for PTSD, who have authored a guest post about this effort.

In any given year, about 14 million adults in the U.S. will experience Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). PTSD can develop after any traumatic event, including combat, hurricanes, earthquakes or experiences like mass shootings, assaults or even car accidents. However, despite how common this condition is, treatment- seeking is low. In fact, only about half the people who have PTSD will receive treatment. To help people understand PTSD, we’ve collaborated with Google to provide simple, direct access to information that may help those who are suffering.

When you search for PTSD in the U.S. on your phone, a Knowledge Panel for the condition appears, providing an overview, facts and treatment information about the disorder. Now for the first time,the PC-PTSD-5, a clinically validated screening questionnaire to test your likelihood of having PTSD, is available directly from the search result. By tapping “check if you may have PTSD,” you can answer a private questionnaire to assess your likelihood of having PTSD and have a more informed conversation with your doctor. Getting an in-person assessment is essential to a diagnosis of PTSD, and this commonly- used screening tool gives you important information you can bring to your appointment.

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PTSD can be treated, and the PC-PTSD-5 can be a crucial step toward getting proper diagnosis and treatment. If you, a family member or friend is struggling, organizations like the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and the VA’s National Center for PTSD can provide support and information. Contact the NAMI HelpLine at 800-950-NAMI (6264) or info@nami.org if you have any questions about PTSD or finding support and resources. Veterans and their families can contact the VA National Center for PTSD at www.ptsd.va.gov for information and resources or the Veteran’s Crisis line at 1-800-273-8255 for immediate support.